audre-lorde

Audre Lorde, 1934-1992

Audre Lorde, 1934-1992

Audre Lorde, 1934-1992
Audre Lorde (1934-1992) dedicated her life and talent to confronting and addressing racism, sexism, classism and homophobia. Born in New York City to Caribbean immigrants. Lorde struggled with communication but had learned to talk, read and write at 4 years of age. She started writing poetry in 8th grade and published her first poem in Seventeen magazine while in high school. In the early 1980s, Lorde along with fellow writers Barbara Smith and Cherrie Moraga founded Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, dedicated to furthering the writings of black feminists. While teaching at universities in Berlin, Lorde mentored many female students, poets and activists, and her impact on the Afro-German movement was featured in an award winning documentary. Lorde shared that language was a powerful form of resistance and encouraged the women of Germany to speak up and out against systemic issues. Lorde’s extensive work continues to ring true today. As a Black, lesbian, feminist, poet, mother, Lorde highlighted the intersectional connections of her many identities. She emphasized that “when we can arm ourselves with the strength and vision from all of our diverse communities, then we will in truth all be free at last”.

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  1. Audre Lorde, 1934-1992
    Audre Lorde (1934-1992) dedicated her life and talent to confronting and addressing racism, sexism, classism and homophobia. Born in New York City to Caribbean immigrants. Lorde struggled with communication but had learned to talk, read and write at 4 years of age. She started writing poetry in 8th grade and published her first poem in Seventeen magazine while in high school. In the early 1980s, Lorde along with fellow writers Barbara Smith and Cherrie Moraga founded Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press, dedicated to furthering the writings of black feminists. While teaching at universities in Berlin, Lorde mentored many female students, poets and activists, and her impact on the Afro-German movement was featured in an award winning documentary. Lorde shared that language was a powerful form of resistance and encouraged the women of Germany to speak up and out against systemic issues. Lorde’s extensive work continues to ring true today. As a Black, lesbian, feminist, poet, mother, Lorde highlighted the intersectional connections of her many identities. She emphasized that “when we can arm ourselves with the strength and vision from all of our diverse communities, then we will in truth all be free at last”.

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