daisy-elizabeth-adam-lampkin

Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin, 1883-1965

Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin, 1883-1965

Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin, 1883-1965
Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin was a suffragist, civil rights activist, and community organizer whose career spanned over 50 years. Motivated by the suffragette movement, Lampkin joined the Negro Women’s Equal Franchise Federation, which would later be renamed the Lucy Stone Women’s Suffrage League. Lampkin gave street-corner speeches and organized other black housewives to actively engage in consumer protest groups. From 1930 to 1965, Lampkin was an engaged member and officer of the NAACP, serving as regional secretary, as the national secretary in 1935, and then as a member of the board of directors. She organized, fundraised for, and bolstered the image of the organization nationally; during her last year as national field secretary, Lampkin was reported to have raised over $1 million for the organization. Lampkin also spearheaded NAACP’s drive to pass a federal anti-lynching bill in the U.S. Congress, and was vocal about the lack of support amongst her white peers on the issue. In 1983, Lampkin was recognized in her hometown of Pittsburgh with a historical marker on the building in which she lived; this was the first time the state of Pennsylvania awarded a plaque to honor an African American in the city.

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  1. Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin, 1883-1965
    Daisy Elizabeth Adams Lampkin was a suffragist, civil rights activist, and community organizer whose career spanned over 50 years. Motivated by the suffragette movement, Lampkin joined the Negro Women’s Equal Franchise Federation, which would later be renamed the Lucy Stone Women’s Suffrage League. Lampkin gave street-corner speeches and organized other black housewives to actively engage in consumer protest groups. From 1930 to 1965, Lampkin was an engaged member and officer of the NAACP, serving as regional secretary, as the national secretary in 1935, and then as a member of the board of directors. She organized, fundraised for, and bolstered the image of the organization nationally; during her last year as national field secretary, Lampkin was reported to have raised over $1 million for the organization. Lampkin also spearheaded NAACP’s drive to pass a federal anti-lynching bill in the U.S. Congress, and was vocal about the lack of support amongst her white peers on the issue. In 1983, Lampkin was recognized in her hometown of Pittsburgh with a historical marker on the building in which she lived; this was the first time the state of Pennsylvania awarded a plaque to honor an African American in the city.

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