sarah-weddington

Sarah Weddington, 1945 - Present

Sarah Weddington, 1945 – Present

Sarah Weddington, 1945 – Present
Sarah Weddington is an American attorney, law professor, and former member of the Texas House of Representatives. She is best known for arguing on behalf of “Jane Roe” in the landmark Roe v. Wade case before the United States Supreme Court in 1971-1972. Born in Abilene, Texas, Weddington intended to become a teacher. But, while student-teaching Beowulf to eighth graders, she decided to attend law school instead. In 1969, a group of graduate students asked Weddington if they would be subject to criminal prosecution for teaching about contraception. Weddington agreed to represent the students pro bono, and this representation ultimately led to Weddington arguing Roe v. Wade before the United States Supreme Court. She was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1972 where she continued advocating on behalf of women. In fact, the first law she helped pass enabled Texan women to obtain credit cards in their own name. When Weddington was an advisor to President Jimmy Carter, first as general counsel for the Department of Agriculture, later as an advisor on women’s issues, and finally as a member of the White House senior staff. Following President Carter’s term of office, she returned to Texas where she resumed her law practice and started teaching at the University of Texas at Austin.

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  1. Sarah Weddington, 1945 – Present
    Sarah Weddington is an American attorney, law professor, and former member of the Texas House of Representatives. She is best known for arguing on behalf of “Jane Roe” in the landmark Roe v. Wade case before the United States Supreme Court in 1971-1972. Born in Abilene, Texas, Weddington intended to become a teacher. But, while student-teaching Beowulf to eighth graders, she decided to attend law school instead. In 1969, a group of graduate students asked Weddington if they would be subject to criminal prosecution for teaching about contraception. Weddington agreed to represent the students pro bono, and this representation ultimately led to Weddington arguing Roe v. Wade before the United States Supreme Court. She was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1972 where she continued advocating on behalf of women. In fact, the first law she helped pass enabled Texan women to obtain credit cards in their own name. When Weddington was an advisor to President Jimmy Carter, first as general counsel for the Department of Agriculture, later as an advisor on women’s issues, and finally as a member of the White House senior staff. Following President Carter’s term of office, she returned to Texas where she resumed her law practice and started teaching at the University of Texas at Austin.

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