Johanna Claussenius Pinther

Johanna Claussenius Pinther, 1861-1938

Johanna Claussenius Pinther, 1861-1938

Johanna Claussenius Pinther, 1861-1938
The daughter of a California pioneer, Johanna Pinther spent much of her life as an activist. She moved to San Francisco’s Glen Park in 1907, and in 1908 founded the Glen Park Outdoor Art League, providing a stepping stone for women wanting to enter the men’s sphere of civic activities. As Glen Park was undergoing a population boom following the great earthquake, members of the League frequently spoke at City Hall to advocate for essential infrastructure. Concurrently, Johanna founded the San Francisco Woman’s Club, served as Glen Park committee chair on San Francisco’s Women’s Sanitation Committee that oversaw sanitation practices during an outbreak of bubonic plague, and was a member of the organizing committee of the California Equal Suffrage Association. As a seamstress and embroiderer, Johanna was well known for her skills. She created an exquisite banner that was carried in America’s first suffrage march in Oakland on August 27, 1908 to the California State Republican Convention. With her step-daughter-in-law, Jeanette Pinther, and prominent suffragist Lillian Harris Coffin, Johanna co-led the march of up to 300 women. Once suffrage was won in 1911, Johanna would be one of the first 20 women in San Francisco to register to vote.

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  1. Johanna Claussenius Pinther, 1861-1938
    The daughter of a California pioneer, Johanna Pinther spent much of her life as an activist. She moved to San Francisco’s Glen Park in 1907, and in 1908 founded the Glen Park Outdoor Art League, providing a stepping stone for women wanting to enter the men’s sphere of civic activities. As Glen Park was undergoing a population boom following the great earthquake, members of the League frequently spoke at City Hall to advocate for essential infrastructure. Concurrently, Johanna founded the San Francisco Woman’s Club, served as Glen Park committee chair on San Francisco’s Women’s Sanitation Committee that oversaw sanitation practices during an outbreak of bubonic plague, and was a member of the organizing committee of the California Equal Suffrage Association. As a seamstress and embroiderer, Johanna was well known for her skills. She created an exquisite banner that was carried in America’s first suffrage march in Oakland on August 27, 1908 to the California State Republican Convention. With her step-daughter-in-law, Jeanette Pinther, and prominent suffragist Lillian Harris Coffin, Johanna co-led the march of up to 300 women. Once suffrage was won in 1911, Johanna would be one of the first 20 women in San Francisco to register to vote.

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