aiko-herzig-yoshinaga

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, 1925-2018

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, 1925-2018

Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, 1925-2018
Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (1925-2018) is a Japanese-American activist who was imprisoned in one of the many Japanese internment camps during World War II. Herzig-Yoshinaga was a senior in high school when first incarcerated, she began her career in activism in the 1960s with Asian Americans for Action (AAA), an organization of Japanese American women organizing protests and demonstrations while working to raise consciousness. In 1981, Herzig-Yoshinaga led research for the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. The CWRIC and Herzig-Yoshinaga’s final report, Personal Justice Denied, included testimony of more than 700 witnesses. As a result of her detailed work, Herzig-Yoshinaga became a major leader in the redress movement. Her extensive research served as the basis for $27 billion dollar class-action lawsuit filed by the National Council for Japanese American Redress against the US federal government.

One thought on “aiko-herzig-yoshinaga

  1. Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga, 1925-2018
    Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (1925-2018) is a Japanese-American activist who was imprisoned in one of the many Japanese internment camps during World War II. Herzig-Yoshinaga was a senior in high school when first incarcerated, she began her career in activism in the 1960s with Asian Americans for Action (AAA), an organization of Japanese American women organizing protests and demonstrations while working to raise consciousness. In 1981, Herzig-Yoshinaga led research for the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. The CWRIC and Herzig-Yoshinaga’s final report, Personal Justice Denied, included testimony of more than 700 witnesses. As a result of her detailed work, Herzig-Yoshinaga became a major leader in the redress movement. Her extensive research served as the basis for $27 billion dollar class-action lawsuit filed by the National Council for Japanese American Redress against the US federal government.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s