grace-lee-boggs

Grace Lee Boggs, 1915-2015

Grace Lee Boggs, 1915-2015

Grace Lee Boggs, 1915-2015
Grace Lee Boggs was a feminist author, activist, and philosopher. She attended Barnard College and received her Ph.D. at Bryn Mawr College in 1940. However, as a Chinese American woman, she faced significant hurdles in taking her rightful place in academia. While working at a university library, she became engaged with the struggles of the African-American community and joined the Workers Party. She and fellow activists C. L. R. James and Raya Dunayevskaya headed the Johnson-Forest Tendency, advocating for marginalized groups including women, people of color, and youth. She translated many of Karl Marx’s essays into English and wrote her own works. She married fellow activist James Boggs in 1953, and relocated to Detroit that year. She authored or co-authored many books throughout the 1970s, most notably Revolution and Evolution in the Twentieth Century (1974), Women and the Movement to Build a New America (1977), and Conversations in Maine: Exploring Our Nation’s Future (1978). Her work and books focused on community activism and organizing. In 1979, she and her husband formed the National Organization for an American Revolution, which published a pamphlet Change Yourself to Change the World: “The greatest kinship and love are found in the shared lives of people immersed in a collective effort to change their society–in search of a more tolerable and ultimately more human social relations.”

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  1. Grace Lee Boggs, 1915-2015
    Grace Lee Boggs was a feminist author, activist, and philosopher. She attended Barnard College and received her Ph.D. at Bryn Mawr College in 1940. However, as a Chinese American woman, she faced significant hurdles in taking her rightful place in academia. While working at a university library, she became engaged with the struggles of the African-American community and joined the Workers Party. She and fellow activists C. L. R. James and Raya Dunayevskaya headed the Johnson-Forest Tendency, advocating for marginalized groups including women, people of color, and youth. She translated many of Karl Marx’s essays into English and wrote her own works. She married fellow activist James Boggs in 1953, and relocated to Detroit that year. She authored or co-authored many books throughout the 1970s, most notably Revolution and Evolution in the Twentieth Century (1974), Women and the Movement to Build a New America (1977), and Conversations in Maine: Exploring Our Nation’s Future (1978). Her work and books focused on community activism and organizing. In 1979, she and her husband formed the National Organization for an American Revolution, which published a pamphlet Change Yourself to Change the World: “The greatest kinship and love are found in the shared lives of people immersed in a collective effort to change their society–in search of a more tolerable and ultimately more human social relations.”

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